Print ISSN: 1812-1217

Online ISSN: 1998-0345

Main Subjects : Preventive Dentistry


Evaluation of the Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Mousse versus Natural Raw Fresh Milk on Enamel Hardness After a pH Challenge

Safa Ahmed Al-Ani; Raya jasm Al-Naimi

Al-Rafidain Dental Journal, 2021, Volume 21, Issue 1, Pages 14-24
DOI: 10.33899/rden.2020.127142.1032

Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CPP−ACP, raw fresh buffalo milk and cow milk on the microhardness of artificial initial caries lesions.Materials and Methods: 100 sound maxillary first premolars were collected and randomly divided into four groups, the teeth in all groups were subjected to pH cycling  procedure then treated with: Group1: n(25) deionized water, group2: n(25) CPP−ACP tooth mousse, group3: n(25) fresh  raw cow milk, group4: n(25)fresh raw buffalo milk. Enamel surface was assessed by Vickers microhardness test device at a baseline and after demineralization and after remineralization. Results: In all groups, there were high statistically significant reduction of surface microhardness after demineralization. There were high statistically significant increase in surface microhardness in all groups except deionized water after remineralization, the highest remineralization effect was found in CPP−ACP tooth mousse group followed by  the milk groups that showed encouraging results with  fresh raw buffalo milk  having superior results then fresh raw cow milk.Conclusions: CPP−ACP tooth mousse, raw fresh buffalo milk and cow milk were effective remineralizing agents which were reflected by increasing the surface microhardness of artificial initial caries lesion, but with different abilities, CPP−ACP tooth mousse was the best followed by buffalo milk then cow milk.  
 

Tensile Bond Strength of Self-adhesive Flowable Composite as Pit and Fissure Sealant Bonded to the Enamel Surface in Comparison with Fissure Sealants (in vitro study)

ibrahim Basheer Badran; Saher Sami

Al-Rafidain Dental Journal, 2021, Volume 21, Issue 1, Pages 135-145
DOI: 10.33899/rden.2020.127668.1045

Aims: The objectives of this study to compare the tensile bond strength (TBS) of self-adhesive Flowable composite with conventional fissure sealants. Materials and Methods : an experimental study was carried out using forty non-carious upper first premolars that were collected of orthodontic extracted teeth. The crowns separated from the roots and  the buccal surface were cleaned and polished to obtain a clean enamel surface. The samples were randomly divided into 4 main groups according to the types of resin material (n:10 for each group). Group I: testing TBS for Vertise Flow, Group II: testing  TBS for Prevent, Group III: testing TBS for Angie, Group IV: testing TBS for Conseal. A translucent plastic tube was fixed  after acid etching application on enamel surface for 15 seconds followed by water rinsed and air dryness, the tube filled incrementally with flowable resin  and fissure  sealant then ready small post screws with twisted orthodontic wire gauge 0.012 inch which placed inside the tube until the serrations of the screws were embedded in the last increment and light-cured. The Samples were stored in the distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. Tensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (Electronic Elastic Strength Tester GT-C04-2, GESTER, CHINA).The values were statistically analyzed using  one way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Results : A significant difference in the tensile bond strength were observed among all groups (p<0.05). Vertise Flow showed higher tensile bond strength value than fissure sealants followed by Prevent , Angie and Conseal. Conclusions: The tensile bond strength of Vertise Flow better than the fissure sealant due to the presence bond (Optibond) with etchant properties.

Comparison of Tensile Bond Strength Between Fissure Sealants Placed After Rubber Cup Polishing and Air Polishing of Enamel Surface (An in vitro study)

ibrahim Basheer Badran; Saher Sami

Al-Rafidain Dental Journal, 2021, Volume 21, Issue 1, Pages 124-134
DOI: 10.33899/rden.2020.128036.1048

Aims: The purpose of this study is to compare the tensile bond strength between fissure sealants placed after rubber cup  pumice polishing and air polishing of the enamel surface. Materials and Methods: An experimental study was carried out using 40 non-carious upper first premolars extracted for an orthodontic reason, the crowns were separated from the roots, the teeth were randomly divided into 2 main groups consisting of 20 crowns depending on the sealant material used (Prevent or Angie), the teeth were subdivided into two subgroups of 10 teeth depending upon whether rubber cup with pumice slurry polishing or air polishing. Group Ia: Prevent Rubber cup (PRC). Group Ib : Prevent Air polisher (PAP), Group IIa: Angie Rubber cup (ARC). Group IIb: Angie Air polisher (AAP). Each tooth in this study was etched with a 37% semi-gel phosphoric acid for 15 seconds on the buccal surface, rinsed thoroughly for 20 seconds, and dried with the air stream to get an uniformly white, chalky-similar appearance. A translucent plastic tube was fixed on an etched enamel surface and filled incrementally with a fissure sealant then ready small post screws with twisted orthodontic wire gauge 0.012 inches which placed inside the tube until the serrations of screws were embedded in the last increment and light-cured. Samples were kept in the distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. Tensile bond strength was measured by using the universal testing machine (GESTER, GT-C04-2, CHINA) and the values were statistically analyzed using Independent sample t-test. Results: A non-significant difference in tensile bond strength was detected between two methods used in the groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: The air polishing method is easy and useful but, there were no significant differences  on the tensile bond strength of material  in comparison with a rubber cup and pumice.

Assessment and Evaluation of Hydrochloric Acid Microabrasion on Enamel and its effect on Microleakage of Anterior Restorations

Raya jasm Al-Naimi; Asaad Mohammed Abd-AlQader; Aisha Akram A Qasim

Al-Rafidain Dental Journal, 2021, Volume 21, Issue 1, Pages 1-13
DOI: 10.33899/rden.2020.128449.1054

Aims: was to evaluate the effect of microabrasion on teeth, to determine the effect of using 2 types of composite resins and influence of storage time on microleakage of composite restorations after microabrasion before making a restoration. Materials and Methods: Fourty premolar teeth extracted were used, the teeth were microabrased and composite restorations were made at certain times after microabrasion according to the different groups of the study, a standard cavity was prepared on the two surfaces of the teeth that were restored with either a microhybrid or nanoceramic composite restoration, the teeth were subjected to thermocycling, and sectioned buccolingually longitudinally . Marginal leakage was evaluated using a dye penetration method. Results: Least microleakage scores were observed when the teeth were restored with out microabrasion, microleakage increased after microabrasion with no signicant difference for the occlusal site for both materials, while a significant difference was seen in favor of Tetric N ceram at the cervical sites. No difference in microleakage scores were observed regardless of the time of restoration after microabrasion, there was no significant difference in microleakage scores depending on the type of the material.
Conclusion: given the limitations of this study, there was an increase in levels of micro-leakage after microabrasion of teeth, regardless of the time of application of the restoration, microleakage was higher in gingival margins in all the groups, and no significant difference in microleakage scores depending on the type of material

Evaluation of the Effect of Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Mousse versus Natural Raw Fresh Milk on Enamel Surface Roughness After a pH Challenge

Safa Ahmed Al-Ani; Raya jasm Al-Naimi

Al-Rafidain Dental Journal, 2020, Volume 20, Issue 2, Pages 183-194
DOI: 10.33899/rden.2020.127159.1033

Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of CPP−ACP, raw, fresh buffalo milk and cow milk on surface roughness of artificial initial caries lesions. Materials and Methods: 100 sound maxillary first premolar extracted for the purpose of orthodontic treatment had been collected and randomly divided into four groups, in all groups the teeth subjected to pH cycle procedure then treated with: Group1: n(25) deionized water, group2: n(25) CPP−ACP tooth mousse, group3: n(25) raw cow milk, group4: n(25) raw buffalo milk. Enamel surface was assessed by a profilometer  device at a baseline and after demineralization and after remineralization. Results: In all groups, there was a high statistically significant increase in surface roughness after demineralization. And there was a high statistically significant decrease in surface roughness in all groups except deionized water after remineralization, the highest remineralization effect was found in CPP−ACP tooth mousse group followed by buffalo milk and then cow milk.Conclusions: Within the limits of the current study, it was concluded that CPP−ACP tooth mousse, raw fresh buffalo milk and cow milk were effective remineralizing agents which was reflected by decreasing surface roughness of artificial initial caries lesion, but with different potentials, CPP−ACP tooth mousse was the best followed by fresh raw buffalo milk which showed superior results in reducing surface roughness in comparison with fresh raw cow milk.

The Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride and Fluoride Varnish on Microhardness of Primary Teeth Enamel (An In Vitro Study)

Sura Anwer Abdil-nafaa; Aisha Akram Qasim

Al-Rafidain Dental Journal, 2020, Volume 20, Issue 2, Pages 283-295
DOI: 10.33899/rden.2020.127447.1039

Aims: This study aims to compare and evaluate the effect of two remineralizing agents:  fluoride varnish and silver diamine fluoride  solution on the surface microhardness of enamel of primary teeth. Materials and methods: A total of (150) primary anterior teeth were used in the study. Enamel blocks were prepared and divided into three groups: Fluoride varnish n(50), silver diamine fluoride n(50) and the control  group of deionized water n(50), then introduced into PH cycle. Microhardness of enamel blocks was measured using Vickers microhardness tester machine (OTTO Wolpert−WERKE GMBH) before and after the PH cycle. Results: There were highly statistically significant differences among study groups after  PH cycle and there were a decreasing in surface microhardness  in  all groups due to the demineralization, but  the least reduction in surface microhardness  belonged to silver diamine group followed by fluoride varnish group. Conclusions: Silver diamine fluoride was significantly better than fluoride varnish in preserving enamel's hardness and resistant to demineralization.